Külföld

Az etiópiai mursi törzs szépségeit és harcosait örökítette meg ez a fotós

  • Szerző:nuus
  • 2019.12.04 | 07:18

A mursik azok, ahol azok a bizonyos tányérajkú nők is élnek, Etiópia szívében, az Omo-völgyben.

Nagyjából 11500-an vannak, elszórtan, törzsi formában élnek, anyanyelvük a mursi. Fontosak számukra az extrém testmódosítások, számukra ez nem csupán hagyomány, de komoly spirituális jelentőséget is tulajdonítanak a gyakorlatnak.

Brent Stirton fotós, a Getty Images hivatásos vezető fényképésze és négyszeres World Press Photo-díjas művész négy hetet töltött az Omo-völgyben Etiópiában. Ez idő alatt tanúja volt egy olyan törzsi konfliktusnak is, ami kilenc ember életét követelte.

A mursik mindennapjairól és különleges ünnepeikről különleges fotósorozatot készített:

 

A bejegyzés megtekintése az Instagramon

 

This #Mursi woman in the Omo Valley represented an interesting take on beauty for me. There are a few theories on the origins of these lip-plates. One is that they were a disincentive to slavers to target these women, another is the idea that the size of the lip plate conveys social status and increases dowry price for marriage. Either way, these days the lip plates represent a bizarre economy as the Mursi increasingly rely on tourism dollars for sustenance. I took this picture in 2006, when no road existed to bring tourists to the #Omo. It was much more difficult to get there and there had been far fewer photographers at that time. There was a completely different take on money then, it was not unusual to come into a remote village only accessible via the river, be met with some aggression and only after a negotiation with the head of the village, be allowed to take a few pictures. I always tried to give food or medicine but sometimes the head man wanted cash. Ironically, on one occasion, I came back to a village the next day and saw the Birr notes I had given blowing around on the ground. Money was not that highly valued at the time and they were far more interested in my Leatherman multi-tool. This particular group had also never seen flash before, and I had to calm these ladies down after it first went off. After that they thought it was hilarious. I feel lucky I got to the Omo before it became a tourist phenomenon. #omovalley #beauty #lip-plates #tribes @natgeo @gettyimages #canon

Brent Stirton (@brentstirton) által megosztott bejegyzés,

 

A bejegyzés megtekintése az Instagramon

 

I posted something recently on the Chambri #Tribe in Papua New Guinea who ritually #scar themselves to #honor #ancestors they believe manifest as crocodiles. This #Ethiopian gentleman has #scars that are a testament to his #bravery in battle. Each line is supposed to represent an enemy he has killed, most often while protecting cattle, grazing land or water. The pain he experiences during #scarification seals the memory into his mind. Westerners tend to give out medals to our fighters, hugely respected within the military but which most often languish in dusty cupboards, brought out only occasionally for veterans day or reunions. Incredible acts of heroism and selflessness essentially hidden away and unspoken. Perhaps cultures that choose to manifest their courage on their bodies in plain sight have the right idea. I was told that these #men serve as role models in their villages and are widely respected. We seem to be a little short on visible role models in the so-called first world these days. #ethiopia @natgeo @canonuk @profotoglobal #braveryinbattle

Brent Stirton (@brentstirton) által megosztott bejegyzés,

 

A bejegyzés megtekintése az Instagramon

 

Tomorrow is #internationalwomensday so here are a couple of strong ladies from Ethiopia. African #women hold the continent together but when it comes to the equal rights conversation, they are often considered second class citizens. As a result, many are denied an education which would allow them to fulfill their real potential. Women are generally considered more disciplined, more self-sacrificing and more reliable than men. Numerous studies have shown that investment in young women yields a far greater return. The majority of university graduates globally are now women. Hopefully we’ll see more #femaleleaders in the near future, they certainly could not screw it up more than the men have done. ⠀ .⠀ .⠀ .⠀ .⠀ #africanwomen #strongwomen #liveforthestory @verbatimphoto

Brent Stirton (@brentstirton) által megosztott bejegyzés,

 

A bejegyzés megtekintése az Instagramon

 

⠀ MIDDLE SEPIK, PAPUA NEW GUINEA: In my work I often see things that are the result of #ceremony that I wish I could have witnessed first hand. This is one of them. The #Chambri tribes are Middle Sepik river dwellers from #PapuaNewGuinea; they have a challenging #tradition that is a ritual rite of passage for young men where their bodies are #scarred to look like crocodiles. In recent years, young women also take part in this #ritual. The people of this #tribe believe that men evolved from crocodiles so they hold this ritual to honor their ancestors – the crocodile. They believe that crocodiles turned into men and lived on the #Sepik River and that’s how men came to exist in this remote area. The initiates are taken to a spirit house where elders use bamboo slivers to cut into their skin, hundreds of cuts down the length of the back. During this time, they are held down without any pain relief. Once the cuts are done, they lie close to a fire, smoke is blown over the the scars and then clay and tree oil are applied to make the skin raised and appear scale-like when it heals. Once the initiates emerge from the ceremony, the #crocodile #spirit now dwells within them. #scarredbody #tribalritual #scarification #sepiktribes

Brent Stirton (@brentstirton) által megosztott bejegyzés,

 

A bejegyzés megtekintése az Instagramon

 

I was fortunate to see Lion #Dancers from the #Sakuma tribe perform the story of their lion killing outside a village in rural Tanzania. #Liondancers are men who have killed a lion in defense of their cattle or their village. Once they have proved themselves, they can then be hired to perform this service for others and this is where things get complicated for conservation. They are a deeply superstitious people who believe that once they have killed a lion they have to become a lion dancer for 3 to 5 years to avoid going mad. They spend a year or longer preparing with the local witchdoctor and then go from village to village seeing their relatives and dancing while collecting tribute for their bravery. In a time when lion are very scarce in the region, this practice is actively discouraged by conservation organizations and it is slowly dying out. When the dancers appear in the villages, they are often praised and given money, goats and even sometimes a small cow. #killedlion #tradition #tanzania #natgeo #dancers

Brent Stirton (@brentstirton) által megosztott bejegyzés,

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